group mail play plus user camera comment close arrow-down

Sevilla - Tenerife

Sail the start of Ferdinand Magellan's historic voyage with us

  • 12
    days
  • 850
    nautical miles
  • cost €1390,- p.p.
    4/6 person cabin
  • cost €1640,- p.p.
    2 person cabin

In the footsteps of Ferdinand Magellan

In September 2019 Bark EUROPA will depart from Sevilla to commemorate the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan. In 1519, Ferdinand Magellan departed from Sevilla for the first circumnavigation of the Earth. Set sail with us and celebrate the 500th year anniversary of this heroic adventure. We will leave from Sevilla, Spain and make our way South across the ocean and into the Strait of Magellan in Chile where we will arrive on December 12, 2019, in Punta Arenas. Europa will visit Puerto Williams and Cape Horn on our way to Antarctica. After visiting the white wilderness we will follow Magellan’s route again and sail the Pacific Ocean in early 2020.

On the 10th of August 1519, Ferdinand Magellan (c. 1480 – 1521) started his voyage from Sevilla in Spain with a fleet of five ships called the Armada De Moluccas, in search of a western sea route to the Spice Islands in the East Indies. With this voyage, Magellan started the Spanish expedition that would prove long and exhausting. The ship Trinidad, commanded by Magellan, was the leading ship of a fleet of five. In September 1519 the fleet started their quest for the East from the port of Sanlucar de Barrameda and crossed the Atlantic Ocean. They reached Tenerife in the Canary Islands on September 26, 1519. 

Just as 500 years ago this voyage will start in Sevilla. After embarking on Board Bark Europa, we will have a day of excursions in this beautiful old city to find out all we can about the maritime history and the start of Magellan's adventurous expedition. In the evening, after you are settled in, we will enjoy our first meal on board together and prepare ourselves for the start of our own great adventure! Just as Magellan did, we will set sail from Sevilla the next day and sail towards Tenerife. 

A sailing voyage in this part of the world is pleasant. Winds and currents are favorable and warm. The more south you will sail, temperatures will rise slowly. These waters are perfect for a mid-Atlantic swim on a quiet and wind still day. This passage will allow for lots of sail training, climbing and rigging work. Together with the permanent crew, you will have time to learn about maintenance, sail theory, sail making- and traditional rigging work. Lectures about ( Celestial ) navigation, ocean winds and currents, and Marine biology could be held on the sunny main deck under a full set of sails. The usually favorable winds will push Europa towards Tenerife where you will meet the busy and popular sailing community on these sunny and green islands. Sailors from all around the world start or end their world voyages on these Islands, making the yacht harbors crowded with sailors and thus creating an exciting atmosphere on the Island. 

The city Sevilla

Seville is a historic city situated on the plain of the river Guadalquivir. Seville is approximately 2,200 years old. The passage of the various civilizations has left the city with a distinct personality, and a large and well-preserved historical center. Its Old Town contains three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Alcázar palace complex, the Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies. Seville is also the hottest major metropolitan area in Southwestern Europe, with summer average high temperatures of above 35 °C 

In 1519, Ferdinand Magellan departed from Sevilla for the first circumnavigation of the Earth. 
Bark EUROPA's arrival in this city will mark the start of our voyages celebrating the 500th year anniversary of this heroic adventure.
To celebrate this historic moment of the first circumnavigation Bark Europa will be visiting this beautiful city together with some of her sister Tall Ships. The harbor will be an impressive and unforgettable sight. 

Being a Sailor on board Bark Europa

Onboard Bark Europa we call our guests 'voyage crew'. This means that Europa's permanent crew will train you to be a sailor. Unlike going on a cruise, on Bark Europa you will be going on a hands-on, active sailing adventure. You will be divided into three watches; Red watch, Blue watch and White watch, named after the colors of the Dutch flag. 
You will be 'on watch' for four hours after which you have eight hours of free time. 

During your four hours on watch there will be different tasks that will be divided between the members of your watch. There will always be two people on helm duty. You will together, maintain a steady course on the helm. The crew will explain how to steer the ship and what to look out for. 
During the watch there will also be two people on look-out duty at all times. On the bow of the ship, you will stand look-out. You spot ships, buoys, debris, and icebergs in the water then communicate this to the officer on watch. 
The rest of the watch members will be on deck duty. The permanent crew will give you sail training and you will assist in all sail handling. This involves setting- and taking away the sails by hauling- and easing lines, climbing the rigging to furl or unfurl the sails. 

The crew will instruct you how to work on deck and you will learn how to trim the sails to the directing of the wind. During deck duty, there is also time to assist the crew with the maintenance of the ship. This way you will learn how to work with traditional tools and methods. Woodworking, sailmaking, celestial navigation, and traditional rope- and rigging work will all be apart of your sailing voyage. 
The captains and officers of Bark Europa are easy to talk to and like to get involved in your sail training. They will explain traditional- as well as modern ways of navigation. They will organize and run you through safety drills and procedures. 

During your eight hours 'off watch', there is time to rest and enjoy the scenery. You can read a book in the library or in the deckhouse. The bar will be open for a drink and a snack. The crew will be giving lectures on various subjects, from traditional sailors skills and knowledge to science and astronomy. 
During your time off watch, you can still assist the permanent crew and the voyage crew 'on watch' with sail handling and maintenance jobs. The galley team sometimes asks for a hand peeling potatoes or apples on deck so they can make yet another of their famous pies. 

In the deckhouse, there will be people playing games, reading books, listening to music, writing diaries and emails. Your off watch time is for you to fill in, you may do as little or as much as you would like. These hours are also for you to catch up on your sleep.
When you are setting sails, reading or working away on deck, in the galley they are always busy preparing meals to keep everyone well fed. Multiple course meals will be served three times a day with coffee and tea times in between, whatever the weather. In the evenings the crew prepares team challenges and pub quizzes to enjoy together with your watch mates. 

Arriving in Tenerife

The Canary Islands are an archipelago of Spain located in the Atlantic Ocean. Tenerife is the largest and most popular island of the seven Canary Islands. On the island, you can find the third highest volcano in the world; Teide volcano at 3,718 meters. A climb up the mountain will give you exceptional views over the island.

From the 14th century onwards, numerous visits were made by sailors from Mallorca, Portugal and Genoa. In 1402 the Castillian conquest began, with the expedition of French explorers to Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and El Hierro. The natives of other islands resisted the invaders for almost a century. Tenerife was the last island that was conquered and incorporated into the Kingdom of Castile.

The Spanish enslaved many of the natives of whom many died of new infectious diseases. Many of Tenerife’s pine forests were cleared to make fields for crops such as sugar cane, wine grapes, cochineal and plantains. The islands became an important stopping point for Spanish traders on their way to the New World. This brought quite some prosperities to the islands.

However, the crops-based economy of the islands faced the competition of Spain’s American colonies, which caused some severe recessions on the islands. During the 18th, 19th and 20th century, many families emigrated to the New World due to fewer economic possibilities and the relative isolation of the islands. After the establishment of a democratic constitutional monarchy in Spain, autonomy was granted to the Canaries in 1982.

Optional reservation Booking form