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SAILING THE COAST FROM BRAZILIAN ILHÉUS

Noon position: 14 00.7 'S 038 30.0 'W. Overnight the ships course is maintained southbound with full sails. 

the breeze

Noon position: 14 00.7 'S 038 30.0 'W. Overnight the ships course is maintained southbound with full sails. When the sun sets at night the temperature drops slightly and the breeze is felt, making work on board become more bearable than during the hours of sun, as we sailed under blue skies in about 30 °C. At night we also have a little more wind filling our sails and we can maintain a speed of 6-8 knots, with winds from the NE Force 3 to 4. But today, at 10: 30h and the wind drops and our speed drops to an average of 5 knots. We decided to start our engines to help us making some speed. Luckily the wind picks up at 16:00h, so we can shut down the motors.

Amicale des Capitaines au Long Cours Cap Horniers

According to the company Amicale des Capitaines au Long Cours Cap Horniers (IAHS), the crossing of Cape Horn in the traditional way has to be carried out as part of an overseas trip of at least 3,000 nautical miles using only sailing. This allows us to use the motor to assist in our progress to latitudes near Rio de Janeiro. But all prefer to sail aboard the wind filling our sails. The crew for the trip, along with the permanent crew of the ship quickly become used to the routine on board. The tasks of the first are related to assist in steering, lookout and help with ropes and sails, while the latter taught how to carry out these works, oversee operations, do the cleanup, help in the kitchen and is responsible for navigation.

Written by:
Jordi | Guide

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